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dc.contributor.authorAli, Merima
dc.contributor.authorFjeldstad, Odd-Helge
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Boqian
dc.contributor.authorShifa, Abdulaziz B.
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-04T08:22:20Z
dc.date.available2018-01-04T08:22:20Z
dc.date.issued2015-01-01
dc.identifieroai:www.cmi.no:5688
dc.identifier.citationBergen: Chr. Michelsen Institute (CMI Working Paper WP 2015:16)
dc.identifier.isbn82-8062-573-0
dc.identifier.issn0804-3639
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11250/2475306
dc.description.abstractEthnicity has received increased attention in studies of Africa's economic and institutional development. We present evidence on the long-term effects of Britain's "divide-and-rule" colonial strategy that deliberately fostered ethnic rivalries to weaken and control locals. Using micro data from Sub-Saharan Africa, we found that citizens of Anglophone (as compared to Francophone) countries are more likely to: (1) attach greater importance to ethnic identity (vis-a-vis national identity); (2) have weaker norms against tax evasion; and (3) face extortion by non state actors. We address endogeneity concerns using IV regression and regression-discontinuity. These results suggest that Britain's divide-and-rule strategy may have undermined state-building.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherChr. Michelsen Institute
dc.relationCMI Working Paper
dc.relationWP 2015:16
dc.relation.ispartofCMI Working Paper
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCMI Working Paper WP 2015:16
dc.relation.urihttps://www.cmi.no/publications/5688-colonial-legacy-state-building-and-the-salience
dc.subjectColonial Legacy
dc.subjectDevelopment
dc.subjectEthnicity
dc.subjectState Capacity
dc.subjectSub-Saharan
dc.subjectAfrica
dc.subjectTax
dc.subjectTax Evasion
dc.titleColonial legacy, state-building and the salience of ethnicity in Sub-Saharan Africa
dc.typeWorking paper


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